We’ve all been hearing for some time about the burgeoning “Internet of Things,” which has become a “thing” or a meme in its own right. Billions of sensors and devices throwing off pedabytes of data, appliances that tell you when they are needy, automobiles that talk to each other, clothing that can alert your doctor if your sweat isn’t salty enough…all of these examples are real enough to be discussed casually at cocktails, albeit at still somewhat high tech highballs. But there are some who think that a significant result of this over-instrumentation-through-ever-smaller-componentry will be the ability to capture video of nearly anything and everything. Personal drones have leaped the chasm and are fast becoming commonplace as fly-throughs of fireworks, fly-overs of damaged structures (i.e., a church in Napa near the epicenter of a recent earthquake), or fly-bys of soccer games are easily captured and uploaded to YouTube, assuming owners cannot only work the video controls but also possess some basic remote control flying skills.

But drones are the tips of the iceberg. Mobile devices have cameras, obviously, and they’re being used for a variety of knowledge sharing activities within organization. Employees capture key events that are later shared to ensure knowledge consistency. GoPros are attached to all manner of people, structures, and animals (the dog running across the beach into the surf is my favorite). Google Glass continues to polarize people but is now found in a widening variety of industrial and healthcare uses, both to record as well as to display data and video content. And as cameras shrink in size, they will multiple in diversity and penetration within physical structures, machines, and all forms of devices.

“Things” throughout the world connected to the Internet will use cameras to understand and communicate about their surroundings, and physical security will be enhanced – some might say TOO enhanced – by cameras detecting and capturing presence with behind-the-scenes analytics to interpret the nature of that presence. All of this asks the following of organizations: BE READY. User generated content (UGC) is about to explode, and “thing” generated content (TGC?) will help to generate more video than we can all imagine today. Start planning now to manage that video according to prescribed governance policies, making sure your infrastructure is also equally ready to capture and deliver it. Ah, yes, IT organizations preparing for something new – some things never change.

We’ve all been hearing for some time about the burgeoning “Internet of Things,” which has become a “thing” or a meme in its own right. Billions of sensors and devices throwing off pedabytes of data, appliances that tell you when they are needy, automobiles that talk to each other, clothing that can alert your doctor if your sweat isn’t salty enough…all of these examples are real enough to be discussed casually at cocktails, albeit at still somewhat high tech highballs. But there are some who think that a significant result of this over-instrumentation-through-ever-smaller-componentry will be the ability to capture video of nearly anything and everything. Personal drones have leaped the chasm and are fast becoming commonplace as fly-throughs of fireworks, fly-overs of damaged structures (i.e., a church in Napa near the epicenter of a recent earthquake), or fly-bys of soccer games are easily captured and uploaded to YouTube, assuming owners cannot only work the video controls but also possess some basic remote control flying skills.

But drones are the tips of the iceberg. Mobile devices have cameras, obviously, and they’re being used for a variety of knowledge sharing activities within organization. Employees capture key events that are later shared to ensure knowledge consistency. GoPros are attached to all manner of people, structures, and animals (the dog running across the beach into the surf is my favorite). Google Glass continues to polarize people but is now found in a widening variety of industrial and healthcare uses, both to record as well as to display data and video content. And as cameras shrink in size, they will multiple in diversity and penetration within physical structures, machines, and all forms of devices.

“Things” throughout the world connected to the Internet will use cameras to understand and communicate about their surroundings, and physical security will be enhanced – some might say TOO enhanced – by cameras detecting and capturing presence with behind-the-scenes analytics to interpret the nature of that presence. All of this asks the following of organizations: BE READY. User generated content (UGC) is about to explode, and “thing” generated content (TGC?) will help to generate more video than we can all imagine today. Start planning now to manage that video according to prescribed governance policies, making sure your infrastructure is also equally ready to capture and deliver it. Ah, yes, IT organizations preparing for something new – some things never change.

We’ve all been hearing for some time about the burgeoning “Internet of Things,” which has become a “thing” or a meme in its own right. Billions of sensors and devices throwing off pedabytes of data, appliances that tell you when they are needy, automobiles that talk to each other, clothing that can alert your doctor if your sweat isn’t salty enough…all of these examples are real enough to be discussed casually at cocktails, albeit at still somewhat high tech highballs. But there are some who think that a significant result of this over-instrumentation-through-ever-smaller-componentry will be the ability to capture video of nearly anything and everything. Personal drones have leaped the chasm and are fast becoming commonplace as fly-throughs of fireworks, fly-overs of damaged structures (i.e., a church in Napa near the epicenter of a recent earthquake), or fly-bys of soccer games are easily captured and uploaded to YouTube, assuming owners cannot only work the video controls but also possess some basic remote control flying skills.

But drones are the tips of the iceberg. Mobile devices have cameras, obviously, and they’re being used for a variety of knowledge sharing activities within organization. Employees capture key events that are later shared to ensure knowledge consistency. GoPros are attached to all manner of people, structures, and animals (the dog running across the beach into the surf is my favorite). Google Glass continues to polarize people but is now found in a widening variety of industrial and healthcare uses, both to record as well as to display data and video content. And as cameras shrink in size, they will multiple in diversity and penetration within physical structures, machines, and all forms of devices.

“Things” throughout the world connected to the Internet will use cameras to understand and communicate about their surroundings, and physical security will be enhanced – some might say TOO enhanced – by cameras detecting and capturing presence with behind-the-scenes analytics to interpret the nature of that presence. All of this asks the following of organizations: BE READY. User generated content (UGC) is about to explode, and “thing” generated content (TGC?) will help to generate more video than we can all imagine today. Start planning now to manage that video according to prescribed governance policies, making sure your infrastructure is also equally ready to capture and deliver it. Ah, yes, IT organizations preparing for something new – some things never change.

We’ve all been hearing for some time about the burgeoning “Internet of Things,” which has become a “thing” or a meme in its own right. Billions of sensors and devices throwing off pedabytes of data, appliances that tell you when they are needy, automobiles that talk to each other, clothing that can alert your doctor if your sweat isn’t salty enough…all of these examples are real enough to be discussed casually at cocktails, albeit at still somewhat high tech highballs. But there are some who think that a significant result of this over-instrumentation-through-ever-smaller-componentry will be the ability to capture video of nearly anything and everything. Personal drones have leaped the chasm and are fast becoming commonplace as fly-throughs of fireworks, fly-overs of damaged structures (i.e., a church in Napa near the epicenter of a recent earthquake), or fly-bys of soccer games are easily captured and uploaded to YouTube, assuming owners cannot only work the video controls but also possess some basic remote control flying skills.

But drones are the tips of the iceberg. Mobile devices have cameras, obviously, and they’re being used for a variety of knowledge sharing activities within organization. Employees capture key events that are later shared to ensure knowledge consistency. GoPros are attached to all manner of people, structures, and animals (the dog running across the beach into the surf is my favorite). Google Glass continues to polarize people but is now found in a widening variety of industrial and healthcare uses, both to record as well as to display data and video content. And as cameras shrink in size, they will multiple in diversity and penetration within physical structures, machines, and all forms of devices.

“Things” throughout the world connected to the Internet will use cameras to understand and communicate about their surroundings, and physical security will be enhanced – some might say TOO enhanced – by cameras detecting and capturing presence with behind-the-scenes analytics to interpret the nature of that presence. All of this asks the following of organizations: BE READY. User generated content (UGC) is about to explode, and “thing” generated content (TGC?) will help to generate more video than we can all imagine today. Start planning now to manage that video according to prescribed governance policies, making sure your infrastructure is also equally ready to capture and deliver it. Ah, yes, IT organizations preparing for something new – some things never change.

We’ve all been hearing for some time about the burgeoning “Internet of Things,” which has become a “thing” or a meme in its own right. Billions of sensors and devices throwing off pedabytes of data, appliances that tell you when they are needy, automobiles that talk to each other, clothing that can alert your doctor if your sweat isn’t salty enough…all of these examples are real enough to be discussed casually at cocktails, albeit at still somewhat high tech highballs. But there are some who think that a significant result of this over-instrumentation-through-ever-smaller-componentry will be the ability to capture video of nearly anything and everything. Personal drones have leaped the chasm and are fast becoming commonplace as fly-throughs of fireworks, fly-overs of damaged structures (i.e., a church in Napa near the epicenter of a recent earthquake), or fly-bys of soccer games are easily captured and uploaded to YouTube, assuming owners cannot only work the video controls but also possess some basic remote control flying skills.

But drones are the tips of the iceberg. Mobile devices have cameras, obviously, and they’re being used for a variety of knowledge sharing activities within organization. Employees capture key events that are later shared to ensure knowledge consistency. GoPros are attached to all manner of people, structures, and animals (the dog running across the beach into the surf is my favorite). Google Glass continues to polarize people but is now found in a widening variety of industrial and healthcare uses, both to record as well as to display data and video content. And as cameras shrink in size, they will multiple in diversity and penetration within physical structures, machines, and all forms of devices.

“Things” throughout the world connected to the Internet will use cameras to understand and communicate about their surroundings, and physical security will be enhanced – some might say TOO enhanced – by cameras detecting and capturing presence with behind-the-scenes analytics to interpret the nature of that presence. All of this asks the following of organizations: BE READY. User generated content (UGC) is about to explode, and “thing” generated content (TGC?) will help to generate more video than we can all imagine today. Start planning now to manage that video according to prescribed governance policies, making sure your infrastructure is also equally ready to capture and deliver it. Ah, yes, IT organizations preparing for something new – some things never change.